LoginSign Up

Rihanna Doesn't Want Trump to Play Her Songs at His Rallies

15:45 Nov/10/2018


The latest artist who isn't happy with their music being played at Donald Trump rallies is none other than Queen Riri. Rihanna learnt from Washington Post White House Bureau Chief Philip Rucker that Trump used one of her hit songs at his rally in Tennessee Sunday.

"Not for much longer… me nor my people would ever be at or around one of those tragic rallies, so thanks for the heads up philip!"



 

Ð?аÑ?Ñ?инки по запÑ?осÑ? photo rihanna with trump

Between running a beauty empire, being a national ambassador, maintaining style icon status and reportedly working on new music; it's safe to say that Rihanna is a very busy woman. Her long list of roles and titles have not stopped her from staying politically conscious, however —one quick look at her social media pages proves that the "What's My Name" songstress is well informed.

Rihanna’s been on something of a political kick lately. Earlier in the day, the star endorsed Florida Democrat Andrew Gillum elections for the midterm elections. “FLORIDA: You have the opportunity to make history this election,” she wrote on Instagram. “If you’re tired of feeling like you don’t matter in the political process, know the most important thing you can do in supporting a candidate is finding someone who will take on critical issues such as: making minimum wage a livable wage, paying teachers what their worth, ensuring criminal justice reform, making healthcare a right, and repealing Stand Your Ground.”

This isn't the first time that Rihanna's music has been reportedly blasted during Trump's racist rallying calls. In The New York Times' adaptation of Trump rallies into a "Play in Three Acts," Rihanna's music is mentioned in Act II Scene II. "They trickle into the arena, buying slices of pizza, taking selfies with Trump-era celebrities and dancing along to the same playlist at every rally: songs by Rihanna, Tina Turner and Journey."

 

But can she actually stop Trump from playing her music?


The answer is complicated. When a politician wants to use a song as background music at a rally, their campaign needs a public performance license from the copyright holder of the musical composition, rather than one from the recording artist, intellectual property lawyer Danwill Schwender explained in a 2017.





Latest news


Back to news

Copyright 2012-2019
DJRANKINGS.ORG n.g.o.
Chuo-ku, Osaka, Japan
Terms & Privacy